Gun Motor Carriage

M12 Gun Motor Carriage (Images of War)

M12 Gun Motor Carriage (Images of War)ASIN: 1526743523 /
  • ASIN: 1526743523
  • Amercom M16 Multiple Gun Motor Carriage - Half-Track 1/72 Scale Diecast Model

    Amercom M16 Multiple Gun Motor Carriage - Half-Track 1/72 Scale Diecast ModelASIN: B079HHKCJS /
  • Brand: Amercom
  • ASIN: B079HHKCJS
  • UPC: 646341856212
  • Part No: M16

    Can Openers: The Development of American Anti-Tank Gun Motor Carriages

    Can Openers: The Development of American Anti-Tank Gun Motor CarriagesASIN: 1635618592 /
  • ASIN: 1635618592
  • M7 Priest 105mm Howitzer Motor Carriage (New Vanguard)

    M7 Priest 105mm Howitzer Motor Carriage (New Vanguard)ASIN: 1780960239 /
  • Brand: Osprey
  • ASIN: 1780960239
  • Part No: Osprey9781780960234

    Forces of Valor D-Day Series U.S. M16 Multiple Gun Motor Carriage Normandy 1944 Vehicle, 1:72 Scale

    Forces of Valor D-Day Series U.S. M16 Multiple Gun Motor Carriage Normandy 1944 Vehicle, 1:72 ScaleASIN: B00A45ELC4 /
  • Color: Green
  • Brand: Forces Of Valor
  • ASIN: B00A45ELC4
  • UPC: 018876850438
  • Part No: 85043

    M40 Gun Motor Carriage and M43 Howitzer Motor Carriage in WWII and Korea (Legends of Warfare: Ground)

    M40 Gun Motor Carriage and M43 Howitzer Motor Carriage in WWII and Korea (Legends of Warfare: Ground)ASIN: 0764354027 /
  • ASIN: 0764354027
  • Forces Of Valor Battle: US M16 Multiple Gun Motor Carriage

    Forces Of Valor Battle: US M16 Multiple Gun Motor CarriageASIN: B0009IR5MO /
  • Brand: Panache
  • ASIN: B0009IR5MO
  • UPC: 018876810036
  • Part No: 81003

    TM 9-755 76-mm Gun Motor Carriage M18 Hellcat and Armored Utility Vehicle M39

    TM 9-755 76-mm Gun Motor Carriage M18 Hellcat and Armored Utility Vehicle M39ASIN: 1937684466 /
  • ASIN: 1937684466
  • Part No: black & white illustrations

    USA: T55E1 Gun Motor Carriage (x2)

    USA: T55E1 Gun Motor Carriage (x2)ASIN: B002IVLTFE /
  • Brand: Battlefront Miniatures
  • ASIN: B002IVLTFE
  • Part No: Fow-mm07

    M3 Gun Motor Carriage Detail In Action

    M3 Gun Motor Carriage Detail In ActionASIN: 0897477286 /
  • Brand: Squadron Publications
  • ASIN: 0897477286
  • Part No: 39002

    U.S. M16 Multiple Gun Motor Carriage - Ardennes, 1944

    U.S. M16 Multiple Gun Motor Carriage - Ardennes, 1944ASIN: B0006O6EZU /
  • Brand: Forces Of Valor
  • ASIN: B0006O6EZU
  • UPC: 018876812030
  • Part No: 81203

    TM 9-751 155-mm Gun Motor Carriage M12 and Cargo Carrier M30 Technical Manual

    TM 9-751 155-mm Gun Motor Carriage M12 and Cargo Carrier M30 Technical ManualASIN: 1937684393 /
  • ASIN: 1937684393
  • Part No: black & white illustrations

    M40 Gun Motor Carriage and M43 Howitzer Motor Carriage in WWII and Korea

    M40 Gun Motor Carriage and M43 Howitzer Motor Carriage in WWII and KoreaCategory: Gun Motor CarriageThe M40 Gun Motor Carriage and M43 Howitzer Motor Carriage are featured in over 200 photographs, providing a detailed study of the conception, development, testing, and combat use of these key vehicles. As the US entered WWII, the nation lacked heavy self-propelled artillery, instead relying heavily on towed artillery, much of it WWI-surplus. Only 100 examples of the nation's first heavy self-propelled gun, the M12, were built. Finding favor once deployed, attention was turned to developing an improved model. Initially designated the T83, and later as the M40, the new 155mm Gun Motor Carriage was first fielded in the closing months of WWII. Already scheduled for mass production, the M40, and its companion 8-inch howitzer-armed M43, continued to see extensive use during the Korean War, providing crucial support to infantry and armor formations. Historic period images, as well as, meticulously photographed surviving examples, provide a detailed look at this important piece of US military hardware.

    TM 9-751 155-MM Gun Motor Carriage M12 and Cargo Carrier M30 Technical Manual

    TM 9-751 155-MM Gun Motor Carriage M12 and Cargo Carrier M30 Technical ManualCategory: Gun Motor CarriageThe 155-mm Gun Motor Carriage M12 was a U.S. self-propelled gun developed during the Second World War. Only 100 were built; sixty in 1942 and another forty in 1943. The M12 was built on the chassis of the M3 Lee tank. It had an armored driver's compartment, but the gun crew were located in an open topped area at the back of the vehicle. An earth spade at the rear was employed to absorb recoil. During 1943 the vehicles were used for training or put into storage. Before the invasion of France, seventy four M12s were upgraded in preparation for combat operations. They were employed successfully throughout the campaign in North-West Europe. Although designed primarily for indirect fire, during assaults on heavy fortifications the M12s were sometimes employed in a direct-fire role. Limited storage space meant that only ten projectiles and propellant charges could be carried on the vehicle. Given this, a similar vehicle without the gun was produced as the Cargo Carrier M30. This was designed to transport the gun crew and additional ammunition. In operational conditions the M12 and M30 would serve in pairs. The M30, which could carry forty rounds of 155-mm ammunition, was armed with a .50-caliber Browning M2 machine gun. Created in 1944, this technical manual reveals a great deal about the M12's and M30's design and capabilities. Intended as a manual for those charged with operation and maintenance, it details many aspects of the M12's engine, cooling, power, suspension and other systems. Originally labeled restricted, this manual was declassified long ago and is here reprinted in book form. Please note, this text was not produced in large numbers and this replica may have some pages that are substandard in quality. Care has been taken however to preserve the integrity of the text.

    TM 9-755 76-MM Gun Motor Carriage M18 Hellcat and Armored Utility Vehicle M39

    TM 9-755 76-MM Gun Motor Carriage M18 Hellcat and Armored Utility Vehicle M39Category: Gun Motor CarriageTM 9-755 76-MM Gun Motor Carriage M18 Hellcat and Armored Utility Vehicle M39

    M12 Gun Motor Carriage - eBook

    M12 Gun Motor Carriage - eBookCategory: Gun Motor CarriageAlthough only 100 examples were produced, the 155mm Gun Motor Carriage M12 served with distinction as an infantry-support weapon and in particular as a bunker-buster during the U.S. assault on the Siegfried Line in the winter of 1944-45.The ability to rapidly ready heavy artillery for firing lead to the development of the M12 155mm gun in 1941, based on the M3 Medium Tank chassis. The trial vehicle, built by Rock Island Arsenal, was designated T6\. To accommodate the large, rear mounted weapon – a French-made M1917 155mm gun, the engine was relocated forward to a position just behind the driving compartment. A hydraulically operated spade mounted at the rear of the vehicle, which was lowered during firing to anchor the vehicle against the recoil. When retracted into the travelling position it provided a seat for two of the six crewmen.The production run was between September 1942 and March 1943, with a total of one hundred units being built. Though a few were used by training units, most were placed in storage until February 1944, when the first of 74 of them were shipped to Baldwin Locomotive Works to be improved based on further tests and usage in training. This work continued until May 1944.Three slightly different WWI surplus weapons were mounted depending upon availability, the M1917, the M1917A1 and the M1918M1. The M1917 was French built, the M1918 was US built, and the M1917A1 had the French gun tube, and the US breech.The M12 would earn the nickname "Door Knocker" for its pounding of the German Siegfried Line.

    The M12 Gun Motor Carriage

    The M12 Gun Motor CarriageCategory: Gun Motor CarriageAlthough only 100 examples were produced, the 155mm Gun Motor Carriage M12 served with distinction as an infantry-support weapon and in particular as a bunker-buster during the U.S. assault on the Siegfried Line in the winter of 1944-45. The ability to rapidly ready heavy artillery for firing lead to the development of the M12 155mm gun in 1941, based on the M3 Medium Tank chassis. The trial vehicle, built by Rock Island Arsenal, was designated T6. To accommodate the large, rear mounted weapon - a French-made M1917 155mm gun, the engine was relocated forward to a position just behind the driving compartment. A hydraulically operated spade mounted at the rear of the vehicle, which was lowered during firing to anchor the vehicle against the recoil. When retracted into the travelling position it provided a seat for two of the six crewmen. The production run was between September 1942 and March 1943, with a total of one hundred units being built. Though a few were used by training units, most were placed in storage until February 1944, when the first of 74 of them were shipped to Baldwin Locomotive Works to be improved based on further tests and usage in training. This work continued until May 1944. Three slightly different WWI surplus weapons were mounted depending upon availability, the M1917, the M1917A1 and the M1918M1. The M1917 was French built, the M1918 was US built, and the M1917A1 had the French gun tube, and the US breech. The M12 would earn the nickname "Door Knocker" for its pounding of the German Siegfried Line.

    AFV35031 1:35 AFV Club M40 M-40 Big Shot US 155mm Gun Motor Carriage #35031 [MODEL BUILDING KIT]

    AFV35031 1:35 AFV Club M40 M-40 Big Shot US 155mm Gun Motor Carriage #35031 [MODEL BUILDING KIT]Category: Gun Motor CarriageUnassembled/unpainted scale plastic model kit

    Build a Carriage for a Gun - eBook

    Build a Carriage for a Gun - eBookCategory: Gun Motor CarriageThe author, Reiner Ric Brasche born in Cologne, Germany in 1936, grew-up in a world of destruction following WWII.As a result of the Marshall plan -- luckily replacing the Morgenthau plan, which aimed to make the past NAZI-Germany a state of agriculture -- a soon prosperous economy allowed for in-depth education and graduation as an automotive engineer, followed later by a Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering . Corporate life included employment with Ford Motor Co, Europe and extensive coordination tasks in the field of automobile especially safety of the car body structure. The early involvement in international cooperation opened up a broader view. Early retirement from 'corporate', self-employment and the move to the U.S.A., together with the enthusiasm for guns, are the motivation and background for creating this 'How to'-book: Build A (Gun) Carriage. A detailed technical description of wood and metalworking including the presentation of tools required to understand and manufacture a carriage in half scale (2/1), that is based on available instructions in lieu of the invention of the famous Gatling Machine Gun in the early 1860's. The author lives in Lake Worth, Florida. Comments are invited using his Internet address: [email protected]

    M3 / M3a1 Scout Car and M2 Mortar Motor Carriage Technical Manual

    M3 / M3a1 Scout Car and M2 Mortar Motor Carriage Technical ManualCategory: Gun Motor CarriageDesigned and built by the White Motor Company, the M3 Scout Car saw service as a command vehicle, ambulance, gun tractor and patrol and scout vehicle during WWII. Over 21,000 were built between 1937 and 1944 - the vast majority of them the M3A1 variant, which had a longer and wider hull than the original production vehicles. Both the M3 and M3A1 had a six cylinder gas engine (a diesel variant M3A1E1 was produced for a short time), and could carry up to seven men at a top speed of 55-65 mph depending on configuration. Both had a radiator protected by an armored shutter, and a shatter-proof windshield. The M3A1 also carried a front-mounted roller to prevent it from bogging down on muddy ground, and could carry three machine guns (two .30 calibers and one .50) on a hull-mounted skate rail. The M3A1 saw service in the Pacific, North Africa and Europe, with over 3,000 handed to the Soviet Union via lend-lease. While it performed admirably enough in the field the open top design, light armament and poor off-road characteristics led most Army units to replace it with the M8 armored car and M20 utility car by 1944. Originally produced in 1941, this technical manual was standard issue to M3, M3A1, and M2 crews. Originally restricted, this manual was declassified long ago and is here reprinted in book form.

    Gun Carriage New

    Gun Carriage NewCategory: Gun Motor CarriageThe Gun Carriage is made from 3mm MDF, easy to put together and looks great on the tabletop. Model supplied unpainted and will require assembly.

    TM 9-252 Bofors 40-MM Automatic Gun M1 (AA) and 40-MM Antiaircraft Gun Carriages : M2 and M2a1 Technical Manual

    TM 9-252 Bofors 40-MM Automatic Gun M1 (AA) and 40-MM Antiaircraft Gun Carriages : M2 and M2a1 Technical ManualCategory: Gun Motor CarriageThe Bofors 40-mm gun is an anti-aircraft, multi-purpose autocannon designed in the 1930s by the Swedish arms manufacturer AB Bofors. It was one of the most popular anti-aircraft systems during World War II, used by most of the western Allies as well as the Axis powers. The cannon remains in service as of 2013, making it one of the longest serving artillery pieces of all time as well as the most wide spread. During World War II, In order to supply both the United States Army and Navy with a much greater number of guns, Chrysler began mass production. Over the lifetime of the production, their engineers introduced numerous additional changes to make the manufacturing process more efficient, eventually reducing the overall time needed to build a gun by half. In U.S. Army service, the single mount Bofors was known as the 40-mm Automatic Gun M1. The U.S. version of the gun fired three variants of the British Mark II high explosive shell as well as the M81A1 armor-piercing round, which was capable of penetrating some fifty millimeters of homogeneous armor plate at a range of 500 yards. Created in 1944, this technical manual reveals a great deal about the 40-mm Automatic Gun M1's design and capabilities. Intended as a manual for those charged with operation and maintenance, it details many aspects of its sighting equipment, ammunition, accessories much more. Originally labeled restricted, this manual was declassified long ago and is here reprinted in book form. Care has been taken to preserve the integrity of the text.

    M7 Priest 105mm Howitzer Motor Carriage - eBook

    M7 Priest 105mm Howitzer Motor Carriage - eBookCategory: Gun Motor CarriageBased upon the ubiquitous Grant/Sherman tank, the M7 Priest is the iconic Allied self-propelled howitzer. It was the most widely manufactured vehicle of its type in World War ll and was utilized by the US, British, Canadian and Free French forces. Its combat debut was with Montgomery's Eight Army at El Alamein and it fought subsequently in every major campaign through Sicily, Italy, Normandy and the final battles in Germany. In addition to covering all variants of the Priest, this book also looks at the major derivatives, including the British/Canadian Sexton and the US M12 155mm GMC.

    Service of the Piece 105-MM Howitzer Motor Carriage M7 Priest Field Manual : FM 6-74

    Service of the Piece 105-MM Howitzer Motor Carriage M7 Priest Field Manual : FM 6-74Category: Gun Motor CarriageThe 105-mm Howitzer Motor Carriage M7 was an American self-propelled artillery vehicle produced during World War II. It was called the Priest by the British Army, due to the pulpit-like machine gun ring. The first M7s produced were modified M3 Lee medium tanks. The M7 went through a fairly rapid shift from being based on the M3, to having more in common with the M4 Sherman. The first major example was an adoption of the M4's three piece housing, single piece casting and suspension. In British service, some M7s carried a radio set, which took the place of twenty-four rounds of ammunition. In U.S. service, the M7 was a resounding success. During the Battle of the Bulge, each U.S. armored division had three battalions of M7s, giving them unmatched mobile artillery support. A total of 3,490 M7s were built and they proved to be reliable, continuing to see service in the U.S. and allied armies well past World War II. Created in 1944, this field manual reveals a great deal about the Priest's design and capabilities. The manual prescribes the duties to be performed in the service of the M7, by firing battery personnel. Originally labeled restricted, this manual was declassified long ago and is here reprinted in book form. Care has been taken to preserve the integrity of the text.

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    M3 Motor Gun Carriage Half Track Tank Destroyers at Camp Hood (1943 Restored)

    Gun Motor Carriage

    The Army's first motorized tank destroyer, featured here, was the “T12/M3 Gun Motor Carriage,” a modified M-3 half track with a 75mm M1897A4 gun mounted in the rear, an adaptation of the quick firing “French 75.” The idea of such a thinly armored vehicle facing armored tanks may seem insane today, but the Army's tank destroyer doctrine at the time was “shoot and scoot,” where fast moving anti-tank vehicles would harry the advance of enemy armor, shooting from covered positions, quickly retre...

    Tags: M3 Motor Gun Carriage,M1897A4,Kellys Heroes,Tan...

    War Thunder: 75mm Gun Motor Carriage M3 killstreak (8 kills)

    Gun Motor Carriage

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/Arno_Media Facebook: https://goo.gl/PlbMnX Some War Thunder gameplay. USA tier 1 vehicle 75mm M3 GMC killstreak. Outro music: Itro & Kontinuum - Alive [NCS Release] (Music provided by NoCopyrightSounds). Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xKKo.... Credit to: https://twitter.com/itromsc and https://twitter.com/itskontinuum.

    Tags: War Thunder,killstreak,USA,tier 1,WT,75mm M3 GM...